Wednesday, June 26, 2013



20-6-13 VHT Trainings

Today Christine, two students and I traveled to Ruhinda Sub-country and trained VHTs (Village Health Teams).  When we first got to Ruhinda the group and I were a little disappointed because only eight VHTs had shown up when we were expecting many more.  However, by the time training started we had over 20 VHTs involved!  Christine, one of our outreach nurses did a fabulous job with the training.  She included descriptions of both Marasmus and Kwashikor as well as how to identify each type of malnutrition.  In addition, VHTs were trained in how to take a MUAC measurement to determine if a person is severely, moderately or mildly malnourished. 

The VHTs were very involved in the trainings as well.  Many asked questions, and a few even got up in the front of the class and gave demonstrations on how to take a proper MUAC.  It was great to see everyone participating!  Each VHT received a child MUAC tape, and 18+ MUAC tape and a laminated chart delineating the measurements for severe, moderate and mild malnutrition by age group. The VHTs were also provided with a per diem and a soda and snack as a thank you from IECM for participating in our training.

All the VHTs showed great interest and expressed thanks to IECM for providing trainings and supplies.  We are very excited to be continuing our trainings with VHTs.  We will be training the rest of Ruhinda Sub-county this coming Thursday with Child days to follow.




Learn more about Ujenzi Trust at www.ujenzi.org

Tuesday, June 18, 2013


Wangari, our IECM cow, has some exciting news. Yesterday, she was inseminated by sperm from a Fresian bull named Thunder. Currently, Wangari is our only cow and she is producing about 12 liters of milk a day for the children on the malnutrition ward. It is our hope that two cows can provide for the daily needs of the children on the ward (around 40 liters of milk). When the calf is born in about nine months, the milk production of Wangari will increase. Her calf will stay with us and looked after by our herdsman until the age of one, when it will be sold. Rearing a calf until age one can fetch the best price, but is also a risk as calves are more susceptible to illness in the first year.



The hope for sustaining the cow program is to maintain two cows and two calves. Money raised from the sale of the calves will be invested back into the program to pay for vet fees, herdsman’s salary, and other miscellaneous expenses. Maintaining cows to produce enough milk for the needs of the pediatric ward have been challenging. Currently, our pasture is being shared with cows from a local convent and the grazing space is not enough for all of the cows and calves. The diet of our cows has been supplemented with matooke and banana leaves. However, the nutritional value is not enough. An imminent solution to increasing the food supply for our cows is essential, especially with a new calf on the way! 



Learn more about Ujenzi Trust at www.ujenzi.org

Wangari, our IECM cow, has some exciting news. Yesterday, she was inseminated by sperm from a Fresian bull named Thunder. Currently, Wangari is our only cow and she is producing about 12 liters of milk a day for the children on the malnutrition ward. It is our hope that two cows can provide for the daily needs of the children on the ward (around 40 liters of milk). When the calf is born in about nine months, the milk production of Wangari will increase. Her calf will stay with us and looked after by our herdsman until the age of one, when it will be sold. Rearing a calf until age one can fetch the best price, but is also a risk as calves are more susceptible to illness in the first year.



The hope for sustaining the cow program is to maintain two cows and two calves. Money raised from the sale of the calves will be invested back into the program to pay for vet fees, herdsman’s salary, and other miscellaneous expenses. Maintaining cows to produce enough milk for the needs of the pediatric ward have been challenging. Currently, our pasture is being shared with cows from a local convent and the grazing space is not enough for all of the cows and calves. The diet of our cows has been supplemented with matooke and banana leaves. However, the nutritional value is not enough. An imminent solution to increasing the food supply for our cows is essential, especially with a new calf on the way! 



Learn more about Ujenzi Trust at www.ujenzi.org

Wangari, our IECM cow, has some exciting news. Yesterday, she was inseminated by sperm from a Fresian bull named Thunder. Currently, Wangari is our only cow and she is producing about 12 liters of milk a day for the children on the malnutrition ward. It is our hope that two cows can provide for the daily needs of the children on the ward (around 40 liters of milk). When the calf is born in about nine months, the milk production of Wangari will increase. Her calf will stay with us and looked after by our herdsman until the age of one, when it will be sold. Rearing a calf until age one can fetch the best price, but is also a risk as calves are more susceptible to illness in the first year.



The hope for sustaining the cow program is to maintain two cows and two calves. Money raised from the sale of the calves will be invested back into the program to pay for vet fees, herdsman’s salary, and other miscellaneous expenses. Maintaining cows to produce enough milk for the needs of the pediatric ward have been challenging. Currently, our pasture is being shared with cows from a local convent and the grazing space is not enough for all of the cows and calves. The diet of our cows has been supplemented with matooke and banana leaves. However, the nutritional value is not enough. An imminent solution to increasing the food supply for our cows is essential, especially with a new calf on the way!